Muslim migrant in Ireland who stabbed man to death and assaulted two others found not guilty

Published on 15th December 2019 by BrickTop

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Last modified 19th October 2020

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Muslim migrant who stabbed random man to death and assaulted two others not guilty by reason of insanity.

An asylum seeker who claimed to be fighting for Isis when he stabbed a Japanese man to death on a public street has been found not guilty of murder by reason of insanity.

Following the verdict, the deceased’s older sister Shiori Sasaki in a written statement said she cannot understand, “why a mentally unstable foreign national, whose origin was unknown, was allowed to be in the town.”

She said the killer Mohamed Morei had his rights protected but her brother Yosuke Sasaki was deprived of his human rights. “It is truly infuriating and will forever be unforgivable,” Ms Sasaki said.

Mr Sasaki’s father Akifusa, in a powerful statement, wrote: “If there is a god, I resent him. Why did Yosuke have to die?”

The deceased’s girlfriend Kerry Vincent said she was “beyond happy” before Yosuke Sasaki’s death.

She said: “Losing the man I love in such a horrific way has impacted every aspect of my life and every person in my life.” He was, she said, “my best friend… I will miss him forever.”

Ms Justice Carmel Stewart remanded Egyptian native Mohamed Morei to the Central Mental Hospital where he has been since he was charged with the murder of 24-year-old Yosuke Sasaki in January 2018. He will appear before the Central Criminal Court again on Friday December 20 when a plan for his ongoing treatment will be outlined to the court.

Mohamed Morei, of no fixed abode, had pleaded not guilty by reason of insanity to the murder of Yosuke Sasaki at Long Avenue, Dundalk, Co Louth on January 3, 2018. He was also found not guilty by reason of insanity for assaulting two men causing them harm, of criminal damage to a car and of robbery by trespassing and committing criminal damage between January 2 and 3, 2018.

The jury returned their verdicts in a staggering 24 minutes of deliberations. The foreman said: “The jury would like to express our sympathies with the family of Mr Sasaki.” Justice Carmel Stewart also expressed her sympathy to the Sasaki family, some of whom traveled from Japan for the trial.

Mr Sasaki’s father Akifusa said his son was, “adored and grew up lavished with love and affection. He always had a smile on his face.” He remembered his son as a popular boy with lots of good friends. He added: “Looking upon him as a parent, he was a son I could be both envious of and proud of. He filled me with immense pride.”

When the boy traveled to Ireland to learn English, to work and to be with his new partner Kerry, Mr Sasaki said he had an “enjoyable time”. He said he was touched by the kindness of the Irish people and had “such a wonderful time studying in Ireland that he wanted to return to Ireland to be with his loved one there.”

Regretting that he had never shared a drink with his son, Mr Sasaki said: “I yearn to meet my son once more, my pride and joy who grew up to be a fine young man with a gentle heart. If there is a god, I resent him. Why did Yosuke have to die? His life was cut short, he still had what would have been an amazing life ahead of him.”

He added: “I cry so much the tears blind my vision, making work impossible. I cannot continue to feel like this. Yosuke would not want it, he would scold me for doing so.” He begged to see his son again, adding: “I want to meet him and feel his warmth and see his smiling face. All I want is to meet my Yosuke.”

The deceased’s older sister Shiori Sasaki said only Yosuke knows how painful and harrowing his death was, “How cold, how excruciating it must have been.” She said she feels a “devastating sense of helplessness” that she was unable to help her brother and added: “I continue to feel as if I have lost half of my very being.”

She said she has asked herself “again and again” why Yosuke was killed. “A man who has committed no wrongdoing has been murdered.”

She said she can’t understand why an “illegal resident, a mentally unstable foreign national whose origin was unknown was allowed to be in the town.” She said Mr Morei had his rights protected but Yosuke was deprived of his human rights.

She added: “It is truly infuriating and will forever be unforgiveable.”

Ms Vincent said she and Yosuke were looking forward to settling down together in Ireland but they have been robbed of that chance. She described it as an “understatement” to say that losing him was one of the worst moments of her life.

The two men who were assaulted by Mr Morei also made written statements. Cian Murphy said it took time to get back to a normal life and to be comfortable around strangers after being struck by Mr Morei following the fatal attack on Mr Sasaki. He said the fact that someone else’s son died is “what hurt me and my family more than anything else.”

He said the incident has made him realise that life is precious. Sympathising with the Sasaki family, he said: “Yosuke had a whole life ahead of him and that is very sad for me to think about. No parent should have to bury their child.”

Dylan Grehan said his “relationship with the public has forever changed” because he fears a similar attack will happen again. He added: “The thought that moments before the attack he killed someone else will stay with me forever.”

Mohamed Morei, of no fixed abode, was found not NOT guilty by reason of insanity of the murder of Yosuke Sasaki at Long Avenue, Dundalk, Co Louth on January 3, 2018. He was also found not guilty by reason of insanity of assaulting Mr Grehan and Mr Murphy causing them harm on the same day at Quay Street and Inner Relief Road in Dundalk. The same verdict was returned for a charge of criminal damage to a car and of robbery by trespassing and committing criminal damage between January 2 and 3, 2018. The jury spent only 24 minutes considering their verdicts.